Monday, 10 October 2011

Astronomy Photographer of the Year

A selection of entries from this year's competition, held at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich.

Overall winner of the astronomy photographer of the year award, and winner of the earth and space prize

  
Photograph: Tom Lowe/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 Blazing Bristlecone, Tom Lowe, White Mountains, California, 14 August 2009. An ancient bristlecone pine stands before the Milky Way as a meteor streaks the sky. The lighting effect on the tree in the foreground was actually caused by accident when the photographer was setting his equipment up.

  People and space award winner
Photograph: Steve Christenson/National Maritime Museum
  
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
  Photon Worshippers, Steve Christenson, 23 December 2009. For a few weeks every year the setting sun is in the correct position to shine directly through this portal in a large rock formation at Pfeiffer beach in Big Sur, California.
Winner of the Our Solar System award
Photograph: Anthony Ayiomamitis /National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 Siberian Totality, Anthony Ayiomamitis (Greece). Taken during a total eclipse of the sun, this image reveals the faint solar corona usually hidden by the photosphere. The long streamers and prominences show the sun's activity beyond the surface, reaching out into the solar system.
 Winner of the deep space prize
 Photograph: Rogelio Bernal Andreo /National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 Orion Deep Wide Field, Rogelio Bernal Andreo California, US, 10 June 2010. A panorama of a section of the constellation of Orion, including the three famous stars of the belt, the Horsehead nebula and the Orion nebula.
Primal Wonder.
Photograph: Larry Andreasen/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
  
The Sword and the Rose (Orion's Sword and M42)
Photograph: Marcus Davies/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
  
Winner of best newcomer 
 Photograph: Ken Mackintosh/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 The Whirlpool Galaxy (M51), Ken Mackintosh (UK). Drawn together by gravity, two galaxies interact. Eventually the smaller galaxy will be torn apart or swallowed by the larger one - a process that will take millions of years.
Surrounded by Space
Photograph: Fredrik Broms/National Maritime Musuem
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 Whisper of the Wind
Photograph: Dave Brosha/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 
Solstice Full Moon Over Sounion
Photograph: Anthony Ayiomamitis/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
  
Winner, young astronomy photographer 2010
Photograph: Dhruv Arvind Paranjpye/National Maritime Museum
Astronomy Photographer Photography 2010
 A Perfect Circle, Dhruv Arvind Paranjpye (India, aged 14). A solar eclipse photographed in India in 2009. The light around the edge of the circle is the sun's atmosphere, or corona, only visible during an eclipse. The photographer has used the dark clouds to act as a filter.

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